An analysis of the chorus in the play antigone by sophocles

Certified Educator It seems that Sophocles wants to make the point that Antigone made choices leading to her death while Antigone herself wants to justify her choices as being the direct result of her parents' sins. There are many places all throughout the play in which Sophoclesrefers to choices and decisions, showing us that this is ultimately a play about choice rather than fate.

An analysis of the chorus in the play antigone by sophocles

The mighty words of the proud are paid in full with mighty blows of fate, and at long last those blows will teach us wisdom.

Origins and Evolution

The Chorus speakerCreon Related Themes: Page Number and Citation: The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance. Lines The chorus enters. They are elder citizens of Thebes.

They offer a chant to the rising sun This idea sets Creon into With their capacity for hard work and Creon responds that he Ismene continues to plead for Antigone. Creon tells the leader of the chorus that Antigone must die.

Guards take Antigone and Ismene away. The leader of the chorus says that this sounds sensible.

An analysis of the chorus in the play antigone by sophocles

He decides to spare Ismene, She further laments the horror of her coming death. The chorus tells her she went too far in her protests, and wonders if she is continuing All of them were kings He asks the leader of the chorus for advice.

The leader tells him to free Antigone and bury Polynices quickly. The leader of the chorus tells Creon that he must endure his suffering. Creon says that he has murdered his Retrieved September 16, Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing, 13th Edition.

An analysis of the chorus in the play antigone by sophocles

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Greek tragedy, created in the city-state of Athens in the last thirty years of the sixth century B.C.E., is the earliest kind of European drama. After the bloody siege of Thebes by Polynices and his allies, the city stands unconquered. Polynices and his brother Eteocles, however, are both dead, killed by .

Sophocles' Ajax, or Aias (/ ˈ eɪ dʒ æ k s / or / ˈ aɪ. ə s /; Ancient Greek: Αἴας, gen. Αἴαντος), is a Greek tragedy written in the 5th century BCE. Ajax may be the earliest of Sophocles' seven tragedies to have survived, though it is probable that he had been composing plays for a quarter of a century already when it was first staged.

It appears to belong to the same. Antigone is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before BC. It is the third of the three Theban plays chronologically, but was the first written. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes ends.

In Antigone, the chorus represents the elder citizens of Thebes.

Sophocles's choruses react to the events of the play. The chorus speaks as one voice, or sometimes through the voice of its leader.

It praises, damns, cowers in fear, asks or offers advice, and generally helps the audience interpret the play.

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